Yun-Kyung Jeong


Images | About | CV



Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
A full works list is available on request.

By marrying aspects of eastern and western culture in her paintings, Yun-Kyung Jeong’s works are the painterly pursuit of an imagined and idealised natural Utopia. Through the repetition of a leaf-shaped symbol that signifies the elements as one, the artist attempts to portray the invisible and subtle collisions arising from the conflicts between the countless elements that make up the world. Jeong’s current body of work meticulously pursues every possible combination of the repeated sign in patterns that have qualities of optical illusion in their play with depth, combined with a strong sense of perverse three dimentiality. There are subtle hints of western Gothic architecture in the patterns; the curves of flying buttresses and barrel vaults. As such constructions are considered to have a visual similarity with natural forms, this can be seen as a meeting point or collision of eastern and western values. Unlike the western Christian ideology of man over nature, such eastern philosophies as animism suggest a sense of equality.

Yun-Kyung Jeong is a graduate of Ewha University (Seoul), Slade School of Fine Art and Goldsmiths. Solo exhibitions include Axonometric, Sumarria Lunn, London (2011), The Song Am Culture Foundation/OCI Museum, Seoul (2010). Groups shows include KIAF – Korea International Art Fair, with SUMARRIA LUNN//Hanmi Gallery, Seoul (2010), Invisible Bond, Korean Cultural Centre, London (2010), T-R-A-C-E, Shan Hyu Museum, China (2010), Natural Recurrence, SUMARRIA LUNN, London (2009), Long Nights, William Angel Gallery, London (2008), 4482: Korean Contemporary Art, London (2008), SFA Alsop Architecture, London (2007), MiKi, Gallery Cott, Seoul (2006) and Uterus, Space Achim, Seoul (2005). The artist is recipient of a number of awards incuding the Renaissance Art Prize (2008) and the Foster Fletcher Prize (2008).